CPR for Different Ages

3 July 2013
Comments: 0
3 July 2013, Comments: 0
CPR for Different Ages

CPR

An emergency situation can arise at any time, in any place. People who have been trained in CPR classes have helped increase the probability for resuscitation by responding quickly in moments of crisis. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure performed on persons who have no cardiac activity and is not breathing. Permanent brain damage may occur, or worse, death when the brain does not receive oxygen. And thus, performing CPR may just help save a life. CPR for adults varies with CPR for children, babies below one year of age and pregnant women.

This same procedure is done for all ages: check for consciousness and breathing before commencing CPR. Make sure that the child is out of immediate danger. Lightly tap the child and ask if he/ she is okay. Hurriedly check for injuries or other medical needs. To check and monitor breathing, place the cheek on the child’s nose and mouth and sense for breathing. Detect for rise and fall movements in the chest.

For children over one year of age, place one hand on the child’s forehead, lightly tilt the head back, and lift the chin to open airway. If there are observable obstructions in the mouth and nose, remove them. Pinch the nose and take a deep breath before covering the child’s mouth with own mouth. Check for rise and fall of chest. Five initial rescue breaths should be given. Position both hands on the center of the chest. Press down on the chest, approximately two inches, using the heel of the hand. Make certain that pressure is not pressed on the ribs. At a fixed rate of slightly speedier than one compression per second, give 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Keep repeating cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until consciousness is regained or arrival of emergency assistance.

However, if the baby is below one year of age, there is a slight modification in CPR procedure. To open the airway of the baby, place one hand on the forehead, lightly tilt the head back, and lift the chin to open airway. Take a deep breath before covering the infant’s mouth and nose with own mouth. Check for rise and fall of chest. Five initial rescue breaths should be given. Position both hands on the center of the chest. Press down on the chest, approximately one and a half inches, using the heel of the hand. Make certain that pressure is not pressed on the end of the breastbone. At a fixed rate of slightly speedier than one compression per second, give 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Keep repeating cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until consciousness is regained or arrival of emergency assistance.

If a woman is in her late stages of pregnancy, the same normal adult CPR should be performed; however, padding should be placed under the right butt cheek in order to slightly tilt the pelvic to the left. Due to the additional pressure caused by the weight of the uterus on the major abdominal vessels, slightly tilting to the left would allow more venous blood flow to the heart.

CPR can be applied in many different situations. The current age and situation of the victim will modify the CPR methods. CPR classes teach the various ways of CPR. In order to avoid forgetting basic CPR skills, re-certification is advised every two years.

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